Hope Tibet Will Have a Brighter Future

F. William Engdahl:Dalai Lama’s odd friends

This section is a part of the article ‘Risky Geopolitical Game: Washington Plays ‘Tibet Roulette’ with China’, which is originally published by The Centre for Globalisation Research, Canada. (see here)The author is F. William Engdahls, an economist and writer. In this section, Mr. Engdahl highlights the relation between Dalai Lama and Gestapo chief Heinrich Himmler, Heinrich Harrer, and Augusto Pinochet, the dictator of Chile. Here is the article:

Dalai Lama’s odd friends

In the West the image of the Dalai Lama has been so much promoted that in many circles he is deemed almost a God. While the spiritual life of the Dalai Lama is not our focus, it is relevant to note briefly the circles he has chosen to travel in most of his life.

The Dalai Lama travels in what can only be called rather conservative political circles. What is generally forgotten today is that during the 1930’s the Nazis including Gestapo chief Heinrich Himmler and other top Nazi Party leaders regarded Tibet as the holy site of the survivors of the lost Atlantis, and the origin of the “Nordic pure race.”

When he was 11 and already designated Dalai Lama, he was befriended by Heinrich Harrer, a Nazi Party member and officer of Heinrich Himmler’s feared SS. Far from the innocent image of him in the popular Hollywood film with Brad Pitt, Harrer was an elite SS member at the time he met the 11 year old Dalai Lama and became his tutor in “the world outside Tibet.” While only the Dalai Lama knows the contents of Harrer’s private lessons, the two remained friends until Harrer died a ripe 93 in 2006.1

That sole friendship, of course, does not define a person’s character, but it is interesting in the context of later friends. In April 1999, along with Margaret Thatcher, and former Beijing Ambassador, CIA Director and President, George H.W. Bush, the Dalai Lama demanded the British government release Augusto Pinochet, the former fascist dictator of Chile and a longtime CIA client who was visiting England. The Dalai Lama urged that Pinochet not be forced to go to Spain where he was wanted to stand trial for crimes against humanity. The Dalai Lama had close ties to Miguel Serrano2, head of Chile’s National Socialist Party, a proponent of something called esoteric Hitlerism. 3

Leaving aside at this point the claim of the Dalai Lama to divinity, what is indisputable is that he has been surrounded and financed in significant part, since his flight into Indian exile in 1959, by various US and Western intelligence services and their gaggle of NGOs. It is the agenda of the Washington friends of the Dalai Lama that is relevant here.

Of course, pictures are more powerful evidence:

Advertisements

April 13, 2008 Posted by | Articles | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Americans! Let’s boycott the brainwash led by media for special interests

As a American, have you ever been to Tibet? Do you really know people’s life in Tibet? Have you ever heard the tyranny of Dalai Lama? For most of American people, they are being brainwashed by some media which are controlled by some special interests. Your blindly support Dalai Lama, will never ever improve the human rights of Tibetans, will never ever improve your life, but will definitely help some politicians to achieve their political goals. Being brainwashed, is strongly against the fundamental idea of independent thinking and ultimately against individualism which is cherished by American people.

Here are two YouTube video, I believe you may not see it before. I do not want anyone to accept something, but I hope you can give your own judgment based on diverse and enough sources of information.

April 12, 2008 Posted by | Articles | , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Great Consequences of Boycott

It is unfortunate that the Olympic Games is now mixed with politics, which means that some politicians want to use Olympics to achieve their political goals, while many ordinary people all across this world are being exploited by those politicians. Both the Olympic Games and those ordinary people are the sacrifices of politics.

Politicians and ordinary people outside China, when you call on to boycott the Olympics, it is important and necessary to notice the great consequences of boycott. First of all, it really hurt the ordinary Chinese people’s emotion who have been making effort to prepare the Olympics for at least one decade. Chinese people, who had experienced invasions of western imperialism, the bitterness of Communist ideology, and Cultural Revolution, now has achieved extraordinary success in economy, after 30 years reform. Their road was not easy, and they are those people who deserve the host of Olympic Games. Ordinary Chinese people regard the host of Olympics as their own award and honor. You have to consider whether your aim is ordinary Chinese people, or not.

Second, and more important, to boycott Olympics is not only to hurt the emotion of Chinese people, but also to divide this world. After more than 40 years’ Cold War, people all across this world are so hungry to pursue peace and development, especially for those in the developing countries. However, some politicians in western are embracing the old politics of Cold War. To boycott Olympics, let some politicians, such as U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton and Germany prime minister Merkel, build a perfect image of the vanguard of human rights and democracy, however, after the Olympics, nothing will change. The most possible result is the division between China and western countries is widened, while the human rights of Tibetan will not be improved.

If you want to hear the voices from ordinary Chinese people, you can read a latest report from BBC. BBC has selected six Chinese people, to show their thoughts and feelings. Here I give you the URL: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/talking_point/7340987.stm

If you are Chinese, you can express your opinion on that website, BBC will edit and choose someone’s to publish.

April 12, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Chinese Dismayed by Tales of Tibet Violence

Wall Street Journal
http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB120638214966859837-ZxbZXP0r40ZsH_raRzdxl47q7SA_20080423.html?mod=tff_main_tff_top
By GORDON FAIRCLOUGH
March 25, 2008; Page A10

SHANGHAI — Peng Jianwei moved from his hometown in central China to Tibet as a teenager seven years ago, hoping to strike it rich on the country’s Western frontier. Now, his dreams are in ashes. His girlfriend was killed, her parents badly injured and the shop where he worked burned to the ground during riots in Lhasa 10 days ago.

In the early afternoon of March 14, the day the capital of China’s Tibet Autonomous Region erupted in violence, a crowd of Tibetans broke into the clothing store owned by Mr. Peng’s girlfriend’s family, doused stacks of shirts and jackets with gasoline and set the piles on fire, says Mr. Peng. The details of his story couldn’t be independently corroborated.

[Liu Guobing]
Liu Guobing says Tibetan activists burned his clothing store.

Mr. Peng’s girlfriend, Liu Juan, and her parents, Liu Guobing and Wang Xinping, were hiding upstairs. As the fire spread, Mr. Liu and Ms. Wang jumped from a second-story window. Ms. Liu, who was 20 years old and the mother of their 9-month-old son, apparently was overcome by the smoke. Her body was found inside the burned-out shop the next day, says Mr. Peng, who wasn’t in Lhasa at the time of the attack.

Mr. Peng spoke in a telephone interview Monday from Mr. Liu’s bedside in the First People’s Hospital of the Tibet Autonomous Region in Lhasa. Mr. Peng, 24 years old, says he related events as described to him by Mr. Liu. Mr. Liu, who is being treated for spinal injuries, was unable to speak on the phone.

Cases such as the Liu family’s are fueling anger against Tibetans among the Han Chinese, the country’s predominant ethnic group. Han are also voicing frustration with foreign media, which they feel are ignoring their suffering and instead focusing on Tibetans’ grievances with the Chinese government.

For most of China’s Han majority, the anti-Han violence is the central story of the past 10 days of unrest in China.

China’s government has been highlighting the ethnic violence, in part to justify its use of force to restore order. Demonstrations began in Lhasa on March 10, the anniversary of a failed 1959 uprising by Tibetans against Chinese rule. After marchers were arrested, more protests ensued, turning violent on March 14.

Witnesses said Tibetans — many of whom are angry with government restrictions on civil rights and religious freedoms and feel economically disadvantaged — set fire to large numbers of Han-owned businesses as well as a mosque. Chinese authorities have denied journalists access to the restive regions, and almost every day there are conflicting accounts of deaths and injuries by the Chinese government and the Tibetan government-in-exile.

Tales of the suffering of Han Chinese and Muslims at the hands of Tibetans have become a staple of China’s government-controlled press. First-hand accounts of their stories have been relatively rare in Western news reports, in part because of the difficulty of reaching people by phone in Lhasa.

Many of the stories of Han Chinese targeted in the violence echo with the disillusionment of people who believe that what they see as their pioneering spirit and desire to help develop China’s West have been betrayed.

Fan Yunhua, 35, left his hometown in Sichuan province and moved to Tibet last November. He opened a small store selling cigarettes, alcohol and drinks using nearly $30,000 he had scraped together from friends and relatives. The shop was on East Beijing Road, not far from Jokhang Temple at the center of Lhasa’s old quarter, and served tourists and local Tibetans.

“Folks at home all said it’s easy to do business in Tibet,” says Mr. Fan.

On March 14, Mr. Fan and his wife locked themselves inside their shop as crowds gathered on the streets around them. At around noon, a group of Tibetans broke the door open, Mr. Fan says. Some began knocking bottles from the shelves. Mr. Fan says he and his wife were dragged outside. The details of his story couldn’t be independently corroborated.

Seven or eight people began to beat his wife, and as he tried to make his way to help her, he was hit in the head with “a cellphone-sized rock,” he says. A Tibetan woman rescued his wife and dragged her to shelter by a fire truck. His wife and some other Han shopkeepers hid for two days before being escorted from the neighborhood by paramilitary police, Mr. Fan says.

Mr. Fan says he fled and made his way to a hospital where the wound in his scalp was closed with 20 stitches. The couple is now staying in a government-run shelter for victims of the violence. “I still want to do business here. I still like the city. But it depends on whether the government will be able to guarantee our safety,” he says.

China’s government is acting to reassure the Han population, deploying large numbers of police in Lhasa and elsewhere. Heavily armed police even patrolled the southwestern city of Chengdu over the weekend. The authorities also are highlighting their efforts to bring rioters to justice.

At a news conference in Beijing on Monday, the Public Security Ministry said it had detained five Tibetan men and women in their early twenties on Sunday and Monday. The authorities said the five had confessed to two separate crimes of setting fire to a boutique and a car-repair shop in Lhasa, resulting in the deaths of at least seven people — Han Chinese and Tibetans — including an 8-month-old boy.

When Mr. Liu hit the ground after jumping from his burning store, he couldn’t move, and was slapped in the face by a Tibetan man, Mr. Peng says. His girlfriend’s mother broke an arm in the fall. The two were pulled from the scene by other Han Chinese civilians and policemen and taken to a hospital, Mr. Peng says.

Mr. Peng says he and the Lius could understand some of the Tibetan language but couldn’t speak it and had “very good relations” with their Tibetan customers. But, he says, he had witnessed previous altercations between Tibetans and Hans.

Mr. Peng says he believes the riots were masterminded by the Dalai Lama and were aimed at disrupting the Beijing Olympics in August — an assertion repeatedly made by the Beijing government and denied by the Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhists, who is in exile in India. Since the unrest started, the Dalai Lama has said violence isn’t the way to advance the Tibetan cause.

Now, Mr. Peng says, he hopes the government will offer compensation for his and the Lius’ losses. Mr. Peng says he and Mr. Liu are still too shaken to discuss their plans for the future. “This is a sad place. We don’t want to stay here. But we may have no choice,” Mr. Peng says. “We don’t know if we can start it over.” The main concern now, he says: how to care for his son, who is now staying with relatives in his hometown in Hunan.

–Jason Leow in Beijing contributed to this article.

 

 

March 25, 2008 Posted by | Articles | , , , , | Leave a comment